International Day for the Eradication of Poverty

Oct 17, 2012

The situation in southern Somalia has become worse following the drought caused by two seasons of low rainfall. (Photo: OCHA/Abdi Noor Yussuf)

Extreme poverty destroys the lives and spirit of people; it kills more children, young persons, and adults than any war. Every day, people living in extreme poverty are challenged and threatened by lack of food, shelter and access to essential services.

Recognizing that poverty is violence, the 2012 International Day for the Eradication of Poverty focuses on "Ending the violence of Extreme Poverty: Promoting empowerment and building peace".

Learn more about UNDP's work to reduce poverty >

Our Stories

  • Siwa, Egypt—Fatma Ibrahim, a poor mother of six, has been illiterate all her life. As a child her hardworking parents made simple handicrafts and sold them to make ends meet.

  • At 450, the number of people living with HIV in Syria is small. But the stigma that surrounds HIV/AIDS is enormous. In an age of advanced medicine, including antiretroviral therapy, people living with HIV face greater difficulty coping with stigma and discrimination than they do maintaining their health, according to health experts in Syria. Stigmatization is particularly entrenched in the health sector

  • “Four years passed since we fled out of our home in Damascus taking refuge in Al-Hassakeh”, said Nadia. “We saved nothing. Fifteen years of our life are totally erased”.

  • No one has escaped the deleterious impacts of the ongoing crisis. The rapid deterioration of the situation since 2011 is reflected in the increasing number of people fleeing their homes. Situated in the north of Syria, Aleppo was one of the most affected governorate

  • Rushing about her teashop in downtown Eyl, a coastal village in Somalia, Bisharo Abdi looks the part of a busy young shopowner. However, behind this chatty young entrepenuer is a complex story. Life for Bisharo has been difficult. She was born into to a poor family in Eyl and orphaned when she was just a child. She started a small teashop to support the younger brothers and sisters she was left to care for. Today, at only 25 years of age, Bisharo is a widow.

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